Mono Paiute polychrome basket

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mc2084.interior.jpg
mc2084.bottom.jpg
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Mike Rubenstein.sally lundy.jpg
Ella Cain Coll in situ.ed2.jpg
mc2084a.jpg
mc2084.interior.jpg
mc2084.bottom.jpg
mc2084.lundy tag.jpg
Mike Rubenstein.sally lundy.jpg
Ella Cain Coll in situ.ed2.jpg

Mono Paiute polychrome basket

0.01

14 3/8" x  10 5/8" x " high x 5 3/4" high

woven by Sally Lundy of Bridgeport, California

ex: Yosemite Field Days, 1929; Ella Cain Collection; Private Collection

willow, redbud, and dyed bracken fern

excellent condition

$4900.

(mc2084)

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Yosemite has attracted visitors for a very long time. It also attracted many native peoples over the years, most especially the Miwok, Mono, Paiute, and Yokuts. By 1890, it became a clear destination for Anglo visitors. "Collecting Indian baskets became a fashionable hobby in the United States." (Bates and Lee, "Yosemite: A Melting Pot for Indian People and Their Baskets", Strands of Time [Fresno Metropolitan Museum, Fresno, CA; 1988], p.26).

The National Park Service created Yosemite Field Day, which was held in 1916, 1917, 1920-1929. This was a very important event, attracting not only Anglo tourists but native people from many different areas. In addition to a rodeo, there was a basketry competition, triggering intense competition among the weavers. This, in turn, encouraged high quality weaving  as well as innovative designs. "Mono Lake Paiute women, all of whom were related to each other, were the prize-winners in every Indian Field Days for which records exist" (Ibid., p. 27).

This basket, woven by Sally Lundy, was purchased at the Yosemite Field Day in 1929 by a local collector, Emma Cain. Both Sally Lundy and Emma Cain lived in Bridgeport, CA. The Cain Collection was renowned for its extensive Mono Paiute Collection. It was sold in 2005.