Nez Perces cornhusk bag

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Nez Perces cornhusk bag

0.01

15 5/8” wide x 20” long

twined out of cornhusk, hemp, string and Germantown wools

late 19th-early 20th century

excellent condition

$4500.

(mc2130)

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The Nez Perces were migratory people who lived in Idaho, Washing and Oregon in the Columbia River plateau. They traded horses to the Plains Indian tribes. Necessarily, all of their possessions had to be easily transported. Bags were carried by men, women and children during ceremonies as well as in everyday life.

Neighboring tribes in the Plateau area made very similar bags, especially the Yakima Indians. Because their bags are difficult to distinguish from those of the Nez Perces, without documentation the Yakima, cornhusk bags are often referred to as being "Nez Perces". The Nez Perces were the largest tribe in the area.

This bag is a fine example of a large storage bag. The hemp gives it wonderful flexibility and it could easily be tied onto a horse. The Nez Perces were horse breeders and out of necessity, objects used in their daily lives had to be easily transported. Bags such as this were very useful.