Hopi Polacca polychrome jar

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Hopi Polacca polychrome jar

0.01

9 1/2" diameter x 7" high

circa 1880-1890s

excellent condition with normal wear, as is expected of a pot this age. There are a few chips on the rim, as per photo, and a hairline crack emanating from one of the cracks that appears to be stable.

ex: Marcy Burns American Indian Arts LLC; Private Collection, 1999

SOLD

(mc1937)

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This polychrome Hopi jar is pictorial, with unusually large and realistic images of parrots flanked by rainbow bands. These figures alternate with designs that are derived from Anasazi pot-shards, Hopi katsina tabletas, and Zuni-influenced medallions. There is a dark red band below the lowest double framing lines, actually sitting on the bottom of the jar. The slip on this jar is the classic Polacca white slip that develops fine line crackle during firing.

It is rare to find all these types of designs on a single jar from this period. It is beautifully formed and painted and the designs are complex. This is truly an appealing jar to study and own.

An additional reference: It is likely that this jar was made at Oraibi. Walter Hough wrote in 1901: 

"It appears that comparatively recently the potter's art died out among the Hopi of the Middle and East Mesas and
that by the law of village specialization of an art, Oraibi retained the making of pottery until shortly after 1872, when
Dr. J. W. Powell visited the pueblo. The later Oraibi art shows marked Zuñi influences. The Tewans, however, 
practiced the art uninterruptedly, and it has come to be that the people of Hano are the only potters remaining in
Tusayan, and that finally, at the close of the fourth period, the pottery used by the Hopi is of Rio Grande extraction, 
even though it has become thoroughly debased, like many of the arts of the American Indians. Nampeo, an intelligent Tewan woman, however, is endeavoring to revive the glories of the former times.”  From "Archaeological Field Work in Northeastern Arizona: The Museum-Gates Expedition of 1901", Smithsonian Institute Report for 1901; pp 279-358, page 351.